PEER MENTORING PROGRAM

CNUCOM’s Big Sib/Little Sib program gives incoming students the opportunity to find mentorship and guidance before they set foot on campus. Siblings are matched based on similarities in backgrounds and interests, which are determined from a general sur-vey. This maximizes the chance that M1 students get a big sibling who will become their mentor, but their friend as well. The big siblings who participate in this program are cur-rent CNUCOM students who have all made the commitment to ensuring their little siblings have a smooth transition into life as a medical student.

VIRTUAL SUGGESTION BOX

Use this virtual suggestion box to communicate any suggestions, comments, or feedback you have regarding wellness programs, student needs, or campus life. All suggestions remain confidential and will be forwarded directly to the faculty member who would be responsible for acting on each piece of feedback.

The Virtual Suggestion Box is monitored by Erica Herold.

EMOTIONAL WELLNESS

Maintaining social wellness means building genuine, healthy relationships with class-mates, professors, and other colleagues. Social wellness allows yourself the ability and opportunity to connect with the people around you and feel that you are a part of the community. In addition, social wellness will allow you to identify social boundaries for yourself that will encourage communication, trust and conflict management within the relationships you build.

 

TIPS FOR PRACTICING SOCIAL WELLNESS

Reflect on yourself and your needs. Take time to ask yourself what you need and ex-pect from relationships with the people around you. Use that information to reach out to like-minded people and student organizations.

Keep in touch. While there is an abundance of resources at the College of Medicine, you also have supportive family and friends that may not live nearby. Allocate time dur-ing your week to reach out to those people and maintain your relationships with them as well.

Practice self-disclosure. Self-disclosure is the practice of being honest with yourself. Do not deny your gut instinct.

Practice active listening. When we are developing engaged in with other people, it is important that we prevent our minds from wandering during conversations.

 

 

WELLNESS ELECTIVE COURSES

The College of Medicine is dedicated to teaching students how to maintain their personal wellness throughout their time in medical school and beyond. To provide students with more opportunities to learn new strategies for maintaining their wellness and how to prioritize wellness in their everyday lives, the College of Medicine offers three elective courses that are designed to give students the skills and insight necessary for maintaining wellness.

 

MINDFULNESS-BASED STRESS REDUCTION

The MBSR elective course (mindfulness-based stress reduction) is modeled after the MBSR program created by Dr. Jon Kabat-Zinn at the University of Massachusetts. As de-scribed by Dr. Kabat-Zinn, mindfulness is “paying attention on purpose” and remaining in the present in a nonjudgmental way. Research has shown that participation in an MBSR course can lead to reductions in chronic pain, anxiety, depression, headaches and improve quality of life and prevent fatigue and burnout in both physicians and medical students. Mindfulness-based training is currently offered in to up 80% of US medical schools. By participating in this MBSR course, students will be introduced to the idea of mindful-ness as a tool to improve their lives as a future physicians as well as a knowledge base that can be shared with future colleagues and patients who may benefit from the pro-gram. This elective consists of an hour-long orientation session followed by weekly 2 hour sessions for 8 weeks. Each session will include a formal 30-45 minute meditation practice as well as other mindfulness exercises and facilitated group discussions, including a discussion of research articles on the topic of mindfulness. This course will be offered in the Fall Semester (typically Oct-Dec, Thursdays from 5:15-7:15pm) and Spring Semester (typically March-May, Thursdays from 5:15-7:15pm). For more information, contact the course director, Dr. Valerie Gerriets, at valerie.gerriets@cnsu.edu.

 

HEALER’S ART

The Healers Art is an elective course started at UCSF in 1991 that has been offered in over 100 medical schools since that time with ongoing courses at most of these schools. It has often been described by many medical students who participate as one of their best and most useful experiences in all of medical school. The course is given as 5 three hour sessions consisting of both large and small group discussions and designed for MS1 and MS2 students. It uses the discovery model of learning with topics related to professionalism including values of service, healing relationship, reverence for life and compassionate care. More information about the course including research studies are available on the national website: http://www.rishiprograms.org/programs/medical-educators-students/course-description/ For more information please contact the course director, Dr. Rochelle Frank, at

rochelle.frank@cnsu.edu

 

LEADERSHIP

Given the complex and demanding environment of healthcare, effective leadership is of-ten required to meet these challenges. This course is designed to provide you with tools to give you access to being who you need to be, to be a leader, and to exercise leadership effectively as you encounter each of these challenges. In the course we will inquire into the meaning and being of leader and leadership in order to empower each of us to be leaders in our lives, communities, and societies. It is not an academic inquiry into theories, models, and case studies about leadership. The promise of this course is that, if you participate fully, you will leave the course being a leader and exercising leadership effectively as your natural self-expression. During the course your current conventional thoughts will be challenged, new ways of thinking will emerge, and you will leave with new actions to create even greater success in the areas of life and leadership than matter most to you. This 2 credit course is offered in the Fall Semester, one evening a week (typically Tues-days 5:30pm – 8:00pm). Exams are narrative in nature. Each student will also complete a Leadership project as part of the course work. This includes a proposal, a paper about and a presentation for their fellow students. The topic of the project can be anything from school, academics, community, other important parts of the students’ life, relationships, etc. For more information, contact the course director, Dr. Louise Glaser, at louise.glaser@cnsu.edu.

 

SOCIAL WELLNESS

Maintaining social wellness means building genuine, healthy relationships with class-mates, professors, and other colleagues. Social wellness allows yourself the ability and opportunity to connect with the people around you and feel that you are a part of the community. In addition, social wellness will allow you to identify social boundaries for yourself that will encourage communication, trust and conflict management within the relationships you build.

TIPS FOR PRACTICING SOCIAL WELLNESS

Reflect on yourself and your needs. Take time to ask yourself what you need and expect from relationships with the people around you. Use that information to reach out to like-minded people and student organizations.

Keep in touch. While there is an abundance of resources at the College of Medicine, you also have supportive family and friends that may not live nearby. Allocate time during your week to reach out to those people and maintain your relationships with them as well.

Practice self-disclosure. Self-disclosure is the practice of being honest with yourself. Do not deny your gut instinct.

Practice active listening. When we are developing engaged in with other people, it is important that we prevent our minds from wandering during conversations.

 

 

California Northstate University College of Medicine ♦ 9700 West Taron Drive ♦ Elk Grove, CA 95757 ♦ Phone: (916) 686-7300